Tag Archives: trust

Three Agile Tools to create winning teams

Do you want to create winning teams?  Or improve already effective teams?  Agile can help – regardless of what department you are in.  As background, Agile is a software development methodology that uses practical tools and concepts to empower people to be more productive. Here are three tools that you can start using immediately to enhance teamwork and trust in your organization.

Working Agreement

What is it?

winningteams1A working agreement is a document of the values and behaviors that your team defines for how they will work together. It is powerful because it is crafted by the team, for the team (not by management).  It facilitates great discussion about what will work for all team members. It could address topics such as after-hours availability, meeting etiquette, team member attitudes on interruptions, philosophical positions on accountability and more.

How to get started:

The easiest way to introduce a working agreement at the office is before a long meeting. The meeting could be a few hours or a few days, but long durations tend to bring out the worst in all of us. Ask for five minutes at the start of the meeting to document a working agreement. Ask everyone to define the appropriate behaviors for the meeting. You may have to prompt the group with provocative questions like “Are smartphones allowed? Who is taking meeting minutes? When are break times? If everyone is not back after a break, does the meeting commence, or do we wait?” With a little prompting, a healthy discussion should take place. Write down the results of the discussion and keep the working agreement displayed throughout the meeting.  If anyone violates a tenet of the working agreement, any team member can gently point out the discrepancy and the meeting can continue. This simple introduction to working agreements will allow people to become familiar with the practice and then you can apply it more broadly to project teams.

Agile Culture: Management and Transparency

Image Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transparency_and_translucency

Image Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transparency_and_translucency

This is a blog series about the impacts of an Agile implementation for management.  We have already discussed trust  and teamwork, and this post is dedicated to transparency.

Transparency for the Team

People that move into Agile (or Scrum) team typically experience a dramatic increase in their involvement in the business.  They have access to more information and they are participants in conversations that would have excluded them in the past.   The team members now see more of the Product Vision or Roadmap than they ever have before.  They probably have a task board where they can see which tasks are in which state.  They should be having a Daily Stand-Up meeting where the team learns if anything is standing in the way of progress for their development effort.  They are now included in conversations about scope and timing and release planning.  Thus, from the team member’s perspective, transparency has increased exponentially.

This is not necessarily true for management.  When you have a team that you trust and that is working together, the transparency for management might actually decrease in some ways.  As a manager or Director, you will no longer know everything that is happening on your teams in an Agile environment for two main reasons.  (1) You trust the teams to work together to deliver so you no longer micro-manage them and (2) Because of the trust and teamwork, more things are happening than ever before and it is much harder – and unnecessary – to stay on top of everything.

Agile Culture: Management and Trust

I recently led a discussion on the impacts of Agile on the culture of an organization.  I shared that if your company is undergoing an Agile transformation and you aren’t uncomfortable, then you aren’t stretching enough.  Agile is uncomfortable.  It is awesome and the positive impacts on productivity, collaboration and customer and employee satisfaction are profound.  But getting there can be bumpy.  This blog is dedicated to the subject of trust and how it plays out with management.

Trust and Teenagers

trust-230x300

Image Source: http://www.webapptesting.com/trust-no-one-who-doesnt-localize-their-apps/2012/08/

A good analogy on trust is college freshman.  If anyone has sent away a child, niece, nephew or neighbor, then you know something about trust.  When we send our loved ones away to a land of temptation with minimal supervision and high expectations, we have to trust them.  How do we do that?  Well, hopefully a number of factors are working towards the positive.  We hope the following about college freshmen:

–          They have a strong foundation

–          They are smart/intelligent

–          They are capable of learning from their mistakes

If an 18 year old has these qualities, they will probably fare well in their new environment.  They have a foundation of values and experiences that will influence their decisions, they are smart people who can navigate through new experiences and if they do make a wrong turn, they can learn from their mistakes and course correct.

So why is it that we are able to trust immature and hormonal teenagers but we cannot trust our employees?  Are the same factors not also true about our employees?