Tag Archives: retrospective

Scrum Meetings

There are a handful of meetings that the Scrum Methodology includes as part of the cadence and this blog addresses each one and why they are important.

teamwork

Image Source: http://silenced-no-longer.blogspot.com/2012/11/a-revelation-putting-together-puzzle.html

Sprint Planning

The first meeting is called Sprint Planning and this is a two-part meeting.  The first part is  where the Product Owner has the opportunity to clarify and answer questions regarding the highest priority items in the backlog.  The Scrum team and Product Owner then set the Sprint Goal by deciding which stories will be included in this Sprint.  This is sometimes referred to as the “What” part of the meeting when we determine what we are going to build.  The second part of the meeting is for the Scrum team to discuss the individual tasks that will be required to execute the stories and any technical considerations or dependencies.  This is referred to as the “How” part of the meeting when the Scrum team decides how they are going to accomplish the what.  The team also usually picks the tasks that each individual is going to work on and estimates the amount of time that each task will take to complete.

The Agile Family

As you can tell, I am a bit of a nut about Agile.  There are so many things about it that I appreciate and now I have something new to add to the list.  We were told about a TED talk by Brue Feiler regarding an Agile Family and I had to watch it.  Following Bruce’s direction, we started our own Agile movement on Sunday night and since then three amazing things have happened.

First, let me share our dynamics.  We have two daughters, 11 and 12.  They are only one grade apart in school and they do everything together – including fight.  We are a loving, caring, sarcastic and funny family who definitely has moments of chaos and meltdowns.  During the school year, my least favorite time of day is just before bedtime.  Since my husband is a stay-at-home Dad, I feel like it is my responsibility to get my little angels tucked in every night.  Let me tell you – shear torture.  They would stall and play and not do what I asked and whine and stall.  You get the picture.  It got so bad we even nicknamed the little one “Delay Fish” from Dory’s character in Finding Nemo.

So as I watched Bruce’s TED talk, I thought – the nighttime ritual is what I want to change.  We started our first family meeting on Sunday with each girl making a list of what they need Agile_Checklistto accomplish before going to bed.  It includes showers, teeth brushing, finding and charging your cell phone and more.  I added some of the items that annoy me – like hang up your towel.  We then turned their notes into a checklist and taped it to the mirror in their bathroom.

We then said ‘what is something that doesn’t work in our family right now?’  The girls said (in their own words) that we weren’t good at respecting each other’s personal space.  Then we defined what that meant and created a Working Agreement. (1) Leave someone’s room when asked. (2) Have their permission to use something of theirs and (3) enter someone’s room only when you have permission.  Pretty reasonable.  We then asked what the punishment would be for someone who violated this agreement.  The girls agreed on the loss of TV on Saturday.