Tag Archives: customer

Sunsetting a product: Get Data

As a Product Manager, one of the efforts that we are often asked to consider is the decommissioning or sunsetting of a product or platform.  It is not always a fun task, but it is very important to the business.  This blog series is dedicated to the steps that a strong Product Manager needs to consider when researching this kind of issue.  The first and most important thing to do is to get data.

If ever there was a project that should NOT be executed based on gut feel, this is it.  You need data to make sure you make the most sunsetprudent decision possible.  There is no way to sunset a product without upsetting some aspects of your business, so this is not something that should be taken lightly.  What kind of data do you need?

Customer Analysis:

You need solid data from the financial and CRM systems of the company to answer the following questions:

  1. How many customers are impacted?
  2. How important are those customers?
  3. What other services have they purchased?
  4. What prices are they paying?
  5. What is their lifetime value?

The Voice of the Customer

Part of Product Management and Agile Product Ownership is to incorporate the Voice of the Customer into whatever you are building.   Whether the customer is a farmer, a small business owner or a busy executive, it is the Product Manager’s job to get in their head and figure out how to solve their problems.  How do you know that you are getting the best information? 

voice_of_user2

Image Source: http://blog.mozilla.org/metrics/2009/07/13/does-mozilla-champion-the-voice-of-firefox-users/

Here are several methods of collecting data and each serves a particular purpose.

1. Interview

Meeting one-on-one with customers or prospects can enable you to collect great feedback.  The trick to the interviewing process is to ask open ended questions.  What is your number 1 business problem? What is the most time-consuming task in your day? What do you enjoying doing the most?  The data that you can gather from these conversations can be golden.  Make sure, though, that you remember that a single data point is just that.  Look for common threads from several conversations and solve the greater need.