Tag Archives: culture

Agile Book – Culture

For the final blog post in our series about our upcoming book, Introduction to Agile Methods, we are going tackle the cultural impacts of an Agile implementation.  Agile is a simple set of concepts to understand (once you read the book, of course) but that doesn’t mean it is easy to implement.  It can be challenging for organizations to adopt principles like self-organizing teams, continuous improvement and frequent delivery.  This chapter examines creating an Agile culture from the perspectives of a team member, manager and an executive.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand organizational culture and why it matters in an Agile implementation
  • Dive into ways things might be different in an Agile organization from a developer, manager, and executive viewpoint
  • Look at successes and failures in behaviors to see the cultural impacts
  • Understand how the Agile principles drive different behaviors in an organization
  • Investigate the healthy team dynamics of self-organization teams, continuous improvement, frequent delivery, effective seating arrangements, incorporating virtual resources, and adapting to the changing environment
  • Explore how an Agile workplace differs for managers and the ways that they must change with regard to teamwork, trust, and transparency
  • Review the role of executives and how their behavior can position an Agile transformation for success with executive alignment, respecting priorities, creating supportive environments for the teams, and driving the right behaviors with metrics

There is so much great content in this chapter, it is hard to pick one excerpt to spotlight.  We chose the executive viewpoint and how important it is for the executive sponsor to embrace the change and provide consistent leadership.

Staying the Course

Image source: http://blog.lifestyleforhealth.com/stay-the-course-guest-blog-by-anna-townsley/

Image source: http://blog.lifestyleforhealth.com/stay-the-course-guest-blog-by-anna-townsley/

An Agile transformation is challenging for most organizations. Some command and control managers will fight the change, offering dire predictions of failed projects as examples of why this is a bad idea. Developers may not embrace the increased accountability and transparency, and some may choose to leave the organization. There are new expenses in the form of seating arrangements, training, and Agile tools that may stress the budget. Agile transformations also have a history of bringing chronic issues that the organization has ignored for years to the surface where they must be confronted. All of these are reasons why an executive might abandon the effort and simply revert to what is comfortable (but ineffective). Any change worth making is going to require effort, and Agile is no different. The strong Agile executive will work through these issues without wavering on the commitment to Agile.

Agile and Product Mgmt – Year in Review

I committed this year to write 52 blogs and I did it!  There are 16 on my previous employers website and 36 on www.runyanconsulting.com.  As I look back and review and reflect on the posts, here are my favorites.

Product Management Blogs

I am very passionate about Product Management and I think it is sometimes an undervalued skill set.  Where I have a chance, I always try to share the strategic and practical benefits that come from having great product management resources.  This year, I wrote a five part series about how to Launch a Product and recently completed a 3 part series on how to sunset or decommission a product.

Image Source: http://www.greenbiz.com/

Image Source: http://www.greenbiz.com/

 

Agile Blogs

I am equally passionate about Agile because I have seen how it can improve people’s job satisfaction and raise the level of productivity and effectiveness for the whole organization.  This category was harder to choose my favorites, so I came up with four.  First, there was a series on creating an Agile Culture and what it really means for management.  This series generated some controversy, which I love because it means we are talking about important things.  Next, I am surprised that many organizations are not familiar with Fist of Five.  We use the Agile technique all the time and it is a difference maker in driving productive conversations.  Many organizations also  struggle with how to incorporate Agile into the day-to-day business, so I offered three options for incorporating bugs and maintenance into your Agile teams.  Finally, I am a big believer in the sacredness of the Sprint and I believe that organizations that are disciplined enough to honor a sprint commitment will typically be more successful than those who are loosey-goosey with the guidelines.

Other

Finally, I care deeply about leadership and family so some of my blogs were dedicated to those topics.  One that has been particularly fun is documenting our evolution to an Agile Family.  We have learned (and laughed) a lot together.  Also, I spent some time really thinking about Innovation and what drives an innovative spirit in some people but not others.  This particular blog might be my favorite of the year.

I hope you have enjoyed some of these blogs and maybe learned something new.  I know that I have learned with each post and I am grateful to have the opportunity to continue growing and exploring new ideas.  What is in store for 2014?  Who knows for sure, but it is going to be a great year!

 

Agile Culture: Management and Teamwork

When it comes to implementing Agile, managers who are used to a “Command and Control” environment are going to be very uncomfortable.  Now, let’s be honest, Command and Control managers are not all bad.  They typically feel a high degree of accountability and that is a great thing.  They feel like their neck is on the line so they want actions to be done as they command so that they can deliver.  But what they fail to benefit from is the wisdom of the team.

Image Source: http://buzzardnbigdog.com/?p=3131

Image Source: http://buzzardnbigdog.com/?p=3131

The Power of the Team

Think about your team or colleagues.  Who has long tenure and has ‘been there, done that’? Who is a relative new hire who may have relevant experiences from a previous employer?  Who has worked in several different departments? Who has worked in several different roles?  Each of these unique traits means that an employee might bring a unique perspective that the manager would benefit from, if they were willing to listen.  Albert Einstein has famously said “we cannot solve our problems with the same thinking that we used when we created them.”  Our employees have great ideas and many welcome the opportunity to creatively solve the problems of the business.

Members of management – manager, director, VP, whatever – should present the team with the problem or opportunity and let them ‘self organize’ to determine how they will solve the problem with teamwork.

Agile Textbook

As you may know, I am very proud to be co-authoring a textbook on the Agile Methodologies. This unique book is targeted at undergraduate computer science, software engineering and business students who do not necessarily have work experience to help them understand the nuances, challenges and benefits of an Agile implementation.  Our goal is to present the information in an easy to digest fashion to provide students with the terminology and concepts that they will need when they enter the workforce.

Studygroup relaxing in beanbags while doing school work.

Image Source: http://www.stevenharveyceca.com/individuals-future-college-students

Our question is:  What should we include in the book?  Is there something that you wish someone had taught you with regards to Agile?  Is there something that you wish new hires and interns understood about Agile?

 

Our book will cover the following topics:

  1. The history and value of agile development
  2. Understanding the different types of agile development
  3. Describing the different roles
  4. Cultural considerations with agile
  5. The new way to collect and document requirements
  6. Grooming and planning
  7. Tracking and reporting
  8. Testing, quality & integration
  9. Market management

We will reference many of the Agile experts as well as present stories and examples to make the information more relatable.

Please let us know your thoughts on what needs to be included.  We would love to get your input!