Tag Archives: collaboration

Agile in 100 words

Introducing Agile into your software development projects, or other organizations in your company or into your life has produced
wonderful, empowering results for many people – myself included.  I often get asked “What is Agile, in simple terms?”  Here is my attempt to boil it down to 100 words which will hopefully resonate for everyone, regardless of your background.

Agile is an approach to problem solving.  We tackle big projects by breaking them down into small, deliverable chunks.  After each chunk is completed, we inspect it and adjust based on what we learn.  We prioritize each chunk based on its value, to ensure we work on the most important stuff first. We work as a team where smart people get together face-to-face to brainstorm solutions to complex problems.  We succeed as a team and measure our progress to immediately address any roadblocks.  We strive to deliver more chunks with higher quality and clear value on a frequent, sustainable basis.

100Cloud

What do you think?  What is missing?  Does that make sense to people who aren’t part of this movement?  I would love to hear what you think.

 

 

 

To learn more, please reference the book Change, Inc.: An Agile Fable of Transformation available on www.amazon.com.

Agile Family – A Recap

We became an “Agile Family” in 2013 and I first blogged about it in August. Since then, we have had a number of family meetings and we have learned some very interesting things along the way.  Here is a recap of our findings.

1. Face-to-face collaboration matters.

Those of you who are familiar with Agile and its principles know that face-to-face communication and frequent opportunities to Runyan_Familycollaborate are essential to Agile.  Turns out, the same is true with the family.  When we asked the retrospective-type question “What do you want to do more of?” our tween daughters (ages 11 and 12) said more family activities.  What?!? Our kids are at the age of boyfriends and texting and thinking parents are uncool and yet — they want to spend more time with us.  And when we inquired about the types of activities, it wasn’t watching TV or playing video games.  It was electronics-free hiking and bowling and ice skating.  You could have knocked me over with a feather when I heard that, but since then, we have become closer as a family – as a team.