Monthly Archives: August 2015

Planning Poker for Chores

We are an Agile family. Some of our processes work better than others, in typical Agile fashion, but we aspire to continously learn and improve.  Our latest family problem is chores. We have three teenagers and determining what is fair and finding a common “definition of done” is quite challenging, filled with all kinds of wonderful teenage angst. PlanningPoker Our activities tonight are attempting to bring clarity.

Step 1: Define chores with a Definition of Done

First, we sat down with index cards and listed out the chores, one per page. Truthfully, I did this mostly on my own but I read them all to the kids to make sure they agreed.

The final list was as follows:

  1. Empty kitchen trash and take out recycling whenever full (2)
  2. Empty all trash cans, take trash to curb on Tuesday morning, retrieve Tuesday night (1)
  3. Vacuum tile floors upstairs – baths and laundry room (we have a dog that sheds) twice a week (5)
  4. Vacuum upstairs carpets once a week (8)
  5. Vacuum downstairs floors once a week (8)
  6. Empty full dishwasher whenever clean (5)
  7. Clean off counters, tables, put shoes in closets nightly (5)
  8. Do dinner dishes and put away left-overs nightly, not pots and pans (8)
  9. Wash pots and pans, dry them and put them away by 9:00 a.m. the next morning (13)

Lessons from an Ironman

My husband completed his first Ironman in Panama City, Florida. Something remarkable happened during the race and it makes me ponder similar implications in the work place. My husband’s watch broke. Actually, his second watch broke. The first one was kicked off and now sits on the ocean floor of the Gulf of Mexico. The second watch went black 90 minutes into the bike ride. So here he is, doing his first Ironman and he has virtually no ability to pace himself. The only way that he can ‘tell time’ is to watch the path of the sun and the only way he knows his relative position is to pass a mile marker, gauge his approximate speed and use that information to make decisions about nutrition and his pace.ironman2

As I am sure you can imagine, Ironman races are incredibly difficult. It is a 2.4 mile swim followed by a 112 mile bike following by a 26.2 mile run (a full marathon). Many well-experienced athletes have made the mistake of going too hard in the swim or the bike, only to find that their body doesn’t have enough energy left to finish the run. This is a very real risk and one that should not be taken lightly. So how do you, as a first time Ironman, pace yourself on the bike when you have no timepiece? Well, you do your best. And you listen to your body. And guess. And maybe pray a bit.