Agile Textbook

As you may know, I am very proud to be co-authoring a textbook on the Agile Methodologies. This unique book is targeted at undergraduate computer science, software engineering and business students who do not necessarily have work experience to help them understand the nuances, challenges and benefits of an Agile implementation.  Our goal is to present the information in an easy to digest fashion to provide students with the terminology and concepts that they will need when they enter the workforce.

Studygroup relaxing in beanbags while doing school work.

Image Source: http://www.stevenharveyceca.com/individuals-future-college-students

Our question is:  What should we include in the book?  Is there something that you wish someone had taught you with regards to Agile?  Is there something that you wish new hires and interns understood about Agile?

 

Our book will cover the following topics:

  1. The history and value of agile development
  2. Understanding the different types of agile development
  3. Describing the different roles
  4. Cultural considerations with agile
  5. The new way to collect and document requirements
  6. Grooming and planning
  7. Tracking and reporting
  8. Testing, quality & integration
  9. Market management

We will reference many of the Agile experts as well as present stories and examples to make the information more relatable.

Please let us know your thoughts on what needs to be included.  We would love to get your input!

 

2 Responses to Agile Textbook

  1. Sonja says:

    I would love advice on how to handle having multiple roles on the team. I’m a scrum master, BA, Agile Coach & implementator, Product Owner and it’s a stretch to juggle all of the roles. Idealy all of those roles should be different people, but since we are just adopting Agile I have to make do.

    • admin says:

      Sonja – that is a tough spot to be in, but I understand the limited resources so sometimes it happens. First, I would suggest that you decide which direction you want to head because eventually the Scrum Master and the Product Owner roles will be split (assuming that the efforts are successful and Agile is more widely adopted.) Once you decide that, I would recommend training, if you haven’t already been. There is about 70% shared content between the Certified Scrum Product Owner (CSPO) and the Certified Scrum Master (CSM) training so either way you go, you will be covered. http://www.scrumalliance.org can provide more details. There are some great books out there too, so if you have a chance to read, or listen to the audio books, they can help. I would read Mike Cohn’s stuff if you go SM and Roman Pichler’s books, if you go PO. I hope that helps and please let me know if you want to chat more.

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